1-2-3 Medium Bird Jubilee – #10 & #11

.

Another double-up series post with one of my ‘bird series’, sharing recent photos of six medium-sized birds, out and about, giving me a chance before taking off again!

.

DSC_1993-1 091722

Belted Kingfisher (female)
Length 11.0-13.8 inches (28-35 cm)
Weight 4.9-6.0 oz (140-170 g)
Wingspan 18.9-22.8 inches (48-58 cm)
Chesapeake Farms

.

DSC_2744-1 092122

Brown Thrasher
Length 9.1-11.8 inches (23-30 cm)
Weight 2.1-3.1 oz (61-89 g)
Wingspan 11.4-12.6 inches (29-32 cm)
Chesapeake Farms

.

DSC_6171-1 072822

Cedar Waxwing (juvenile)
Length 5.5-6.7 inches (14-17 cm)
Weight 1.1 oz (32 g)
Wingspan 8.7-11.8 inches (22-30 cm)
Eastern Neck NWR

.

DSC_2589-1 091922

Great Crested Flycatcher
Length 6.7-8.3 inches (17-21 cm)
Weight 0.9-1.4 oz (27-40 g)
Wingspan 13.4 inches (34 cm)
My backyard

.

DSC_9508-2 081922

Mourning Dove
Length 9.1-13.4 inches (23-34 cm)
Weight 3.4-6.0 oz (96-170 g)
Wingspan 17.7 inches (45 cm)
My backyard

.

DSC_9640-1 082022

Eastern Kingbird
Length 7.5-9.1 inches (19-23 cm)
Weight 1.2-1.9 oz (33-55 g)
Wingspan 13.0-15.0 inches (33-38 cm)
Eastern Neck NWR

.
.

Snowy Egret

.

What a lovely surprise to find this Snowy Egret below the Eastern Neck bridge at low tide when I was departing the refuge the other day!

.

DSC_4262-1 092622

Snowy Egret

.

Our Chesapeake Bay resident egrets have mostly migrated south to warmer regions for the winter.  This Snowy is possibly on migration from further north of us and taking time for a food fuel-up and rest at the refuge.

.

DSC_4252-1 092622

Snowy Egret

.

Don’t you just love those golden slippers?!! 

With a glance in the above photo, you can see the back of this egret’s legs are also yellow.  This egret swishes its feet in the water, using those bright yellow toes as worm lures to bait fish.

.

DSC_4246-1 092622

Well, Hello There!

.

On a side note, I have worked with WP Chat and have made some changes to my site settings.  I am not optimistic just yet, but we will see.  For those of you who have been having problems commenting on my blog, would you try again to see if the commenting issue still exists?  Can you comment without using WP Reader?  Or must you use WP Reader still?  I appreciate your assistance, my friends!

.
.

1-2-3 Cute As Can Be – #18 & #19

.

With the warbler fall migration in full swing, I am sharing a 2-for-1 post on my series of three little birdie captures, with the added bonus of these all being warblers.  That’s six charmers!

.

DSC_0366-1 091922

Northern Parula
Length 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
Weight 0.2-0.4 oz (5-11 g)
Wingspan 6.3-7.1 inches (16-18 cm)

.

DSC_3511-1 092422 MagnoliaWarb

Magnolia Warbler
Length 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
Weight 0.2-0.5 oz (6-15 g)
Wingspan 6.3-7.9 inches (16-20 cm)

.

DSC_2850-1 070622

Common Yellowthroat
Length 4.3-5.1 in (11-13 cm)
Weight 0.3-0.3 oz (9-10 g)
Wingspan 5.9-7.5 in (15-19 cm)

.

DSC_2727-2 092122

Palm Warbler
Length 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm)
Weight 0.3-0.5 oz (7-13 g)
Wingspan 7.9-8.3 inches (20-21 cm)

.

DSC_1304-1 091622

Black-and-white Warbler
Length 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
Weight 0.3-0.5 oz (8-15 g)
Wingspan 7.1-8.7 inches (18-22 cm)

.

This warbler is even prettier from the backside.

.

DSC_1302-1 091622

Black-and-white Warbler

.

And finally, number six…..

.

DSC_1069-1 091622

Black-throated Green Warbler
Length 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
Weight 0.3-0.4 oz (7-11 g)
Wingspan 6.7-7.9 inches (17-20 cm)

.

DSC_1070-1 091622

“I got this!”

.
.

Osprey with a Fish

.

Our Chesapeake Bay Osprey have almost all disappeared for their migration to South America.

There are a few laggers, but now sightings can also be those that left from regions north of us and are passing through, stopping for some fabulous fishing and rest.

We passed by this beauty who was beginning to feast on it’s catch while perched on Light Marker #5 in the Kent Narrows channel.

.

DSC_1435-1 091622

Osprey

.

DSC_1445-1 091622

Osprey

.
.

Sunrise at Eastern Neck NWR

This morning’s sunrise at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Rock Hall, Maryland.

­

DSC_3955-1 092122

Sandhill Crane

.

Sandhill Cranes are considered a rare sighting for the mid-Atlantic States.  One had been seen off and on during the summer near my daughter’s home in Delaware, and most notably at Bombay Hook NWR, ten miles east of her.  Several times my son-in-law texted or told me he saw it fly over their home, but I could never sight it in my goings back and forth.

Until two weeks ago!  Yay!!

.

DSC_0223-1 090922

Sandhill Crane

.

Sandhill Cranes are approximately the same height as a Great Blue Heron only bulkier.

.

DSC_0247-1 090922

Sandhill Crane

.

DSC_0227-1 090922

Sandhill Crane

.

Fun and games with my 6 year old grandson and then a regionally rare bird sighting one minute after leaving had me on Cloud 9 all the way home!

.
.

Osprey Family – Near Eastern Neck Bridge

.

Just before crossing the bridge to enter Eastern Neck NWR, there is a man-made Osprey platform on the right, alongside the road before the boathouse.

The Osprey familiy there are always a delight to see each time I go to the refuge.  Mostly I say, “Good Morning!” to them out my passenger window as they watch me pass by.

There’s nowhere to pull over for photos, but I’ve gotten a few shots from my car window when I’m heading back out and pass by them again that are too good to pass over.  🙂  Besides, haven’t ya’ll missed my Osprey photos?!!  😉

.

DSC_3591-1 032122

Osprey Dad

.

DSC_8316-1 M 043022

Osprey Mom drying off after a wash

.

DSC_5170-1 072122

“The Snag” next to the platform, perfect for watch, used continuously all summer
Mom at top, Dad below
(Osprey females are larger than males)

.

They were a great team, successfully rearing two beautiful chicks!

It was not easy for nest shots, but one instance I had to try for one to show the nest and Mom’s developing garden.

.

DSC_3001-1 070622

Osprey Mom and one of two chicks peeking through

.

DSC_1250-1 060322

Dad doing a 180° neck-turn to get those big eyes on me

.

DSC_1251-1 060322

“Wait, let me turn it even more to see what’s over there…..”
(amazing how far an Osprey can turn it’s head!)

.

Another time to get a nest shot.  Mom must have requested full landscaping this year, eh?!

.

DSC_5163-1 072122

Nest with growing landscaping and one of two chick

.

DSC_5155-1 072122

Osprey chick practicing wing-flapping

.

And now it is already that time of the season for our huge Chesapeake Bay Osprey population to begin migrating to South America for the winter.

It appears Osprey Mom may have already left for her winter vacation (the female adults leave first around now).  The past week only dad was seen sitting nearby while the two siblings sat on “The Snag”….

Where they cry, cry, cry, begging for food!  Dad ignores them.

.

DSC_7580-1 080522

Osprey youngster (male) belting out another crying session

.

DSC_7584-1 080522

Other youngster (female) looking to see if Dad’s going to respond

.

These two Osprey youngsters are now in the last of their few weeks here on the Chesapeake Bay.  They’ve been practicing their flight maneuvers and fishing skills daily for weeks, but Mom and Dad were always assisting with extra food.

They are now getting the hard lesson from Dad that they are on their own to fish and feed themselves.  This should force the youngsters to become skilled fishermen so they each can survive their long, migrating journey to South America on their own, to live 1 1/2 years there, and then return back to the Chesapeake Bay in Spring 2024 to start their own families.

Fish-On, Osprey youngsters!!

.
.

Blog Commenting Issues

.

I do not know what is going on with WP, but wanted to let you know that for the past couple weeks I am receiving a few comments on each of my posts as “anonymous” in my comments spam folder, asking that I approve them, which I do, then I reply.  But I do not know who I am replying to.  I also do not believe you are getting your replies from me as you used to.

I have also been leaving comments on some of your blogs that I think are also going to you as anonymous, possibly going to your comments spam folder. I’m told to log in to my account, but the comment still doesn’t show up.  I do not hear back from you on what I said, which is not necessary, but I know some of you would reply.  This is the case on some blogs.  Most of them, I am not having a problem leaving a comment.

I do not know what to do about this.  I’ve read on other blogs of others having these same issues.

Does anyone know what is going on?  WP Chat has been useless for me.

So sorry to those of you who think I’ve not been visiting, “liking” or “commenting” lately, I have been!!!

.
.

One More Butterfly – Monarch Close-ups

.

I kept these photos aside as a separate butterfly post from the last two I’ve shared from Eastern Neck NWR.

I hope you enjoy these Monarch close-ups!

.

DSC_5014-1 072122 monarch

Monarch

.

DSC_6049-1 072822

Monarch

.

DSC_7533-1 103121

Monarch

.

DSC_7533-2 103121

Slurp!

.
.

More Butterflies at Eastern Neck NWR

.

Some more of my favorite compositions of different species of butterflies captured in July at the refuge.

.

DSC_2708-1 070622 black swallowtail

Black Swallowtail

.

DSC_6481-1 102221 combuckeye

Common Buckeye

.

DSC_1149-1 060322 Hobomok or Zabulon

Hobomok (or Zabulon?) skipper

.

DSC_6089-1 072822 ETiger swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails

.

DSC_6273-1 072822 ETiger Swtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail close-up

.

DSC_4885-1 072122 Spicebush Swallowtail Male

Spicebush Swallowtail

.

DSC_4995-1 072122 orange or clouded

Orange Sulphur

.

DSC_6093-1 072822 butterflies

Butterfly Bliss

.

DSC_5060-1 072122 Zebra swtail

Zebra Swallowtail

.

So delicate and amazing!  I’ve seen/shared 18 species of butterflies this summer to date (HERE in case you missed them). 

I’m hoping to capture and share more species who will be stopping by the refuge’s Butterfly Garden and meadows for food in September and October, as they make their way south for the winter. 

.
.
error: Content is protected !!
%d bloggers like this: