Common Gallinules

.

Formerly called the Marsh Hen or Common Moorhen and closely related to moorhen species in the Old World, the Common Gallinule is in the rail family.

.

DSC_9786-1 121620

Common Gallinules

.

Even though it’s long toes have no lobes or webbing, the Common Gallinule can still swim like a duck.

.

DSC_9785-2 121620

Common Gallinule

.

There are a lot of these birds at the 10,000 Islands NWR Marsh Trail.Β  In the morning, no matter who’s there at the refuge, you’ll find these birds there, calling the loudest and almost nonstop.

.

DSC_9788-1 121620

Common Gallinule calling from mangroves

.

They may be loud, but the Common Gallinule is also a shy bird, so its been fun trying to capture them when they popped out from their mangrove hidings.Β  These are my favorite photos from several visits the past month or so.

.

DSC_3065-1 12021

Common Gallinule

.

.

33 thoughts on “Common Gallinules

  1. Thanks so much for not only great photos but the info on how the name has changed. Also interesting that they can move like a duck, although without webbed feet. I love the bits of information you include with you pictures. We are never too old to learn something new!

    • Awww…..thank you, Susan, and you’re welcome! I keep on learning myself as I go along and I love it! I’ve hoped others would like learning a little along the way if they choose. 😊

  2. Very lovely, we have those here at the wetlands that I go to often. I don’t remember what they sound like. I will need to pay more attention! The bird I think we have the most of are coots!

  3. Amazing how clear the water is — those long yellow legs can be seen clearly through it. I went to All About Brids to listen to the call, almost like a loud chicken. πŸ™‚

    • They are some pretty legs! πŸ™‚ Re hearing the sound, you know now why they used to be called a Marsh Hen. πŸ™‚ I tried to figure out how to add an audio clip to this post to hear it but was unsuccessful lol. I’ll work on figuring that out for the future!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: