Birds on a Foggy Morning

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The fog was beginning to burn off this morning as I headed down the trail to reach the wetlands.

One of my first peaks through a window in the trees….

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Oh my!  This was looking to be promising morning, as I continued along.

I stopped at another opening through the trees….

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A few more wide angle shots…..

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Birds in the above photos include Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Great Blue Herons, Tricolored Herons, Little Blue Herons, White Pelicans, Wood Storks, Roseate Spoonbills, White Ibis, Common Gallinules, and Double-crested Cormorants.

Not shown but in the immediate surroundings of the above photos I also photographed Glossy Ibis, Brown Pelicans, Green Herons, Anhingas, Blue-winged Teal, and a few small shorebirds (maybe sandpipers or willets).

Some close-up favorites to come!

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50 thoughts on “Birds on a Foggy Morning

  1. What beautiful scenes! I love it when mostly wade birds congregate. Lovely captures. Great job, Donna. πŸ™‚

    • I was surely blessed, Ashley, wow! I was so glad I went, so much so that I went back again this morning to arrive almost an hour earlier. No fog this morning but there had to be over a thousand birds, forcing more to be closer to the trail. What a blessed sight to behold, I’d never seen anything like it except in photos. Some of those photos forthcoming, if I can narrow down to a few favorites, lol. πŸ™‚

    • Thank you, Rudi! It was so great I went back this morning. It wasn’t foggy but there were over a thousand birds this time!! It was fabulous!! I have 1500 photos to wade through….. πŸ˜‰

    • Thank you, Deborah! For the last several days, they’ve been coming into that spot, more and more each day. I went back this morning, and there were over a thousand birds there, I’d never seen anything like it! I took 1500 photos (ugh!) hehe

  2. Oh boy did I ever LOVE these photos, Donna. This abundance of waders in the foggy morning and mangroves are spectacular! That’s quite a repertoire of different species too. How very exhilarating it must’ve been for you…it was for me, and I wasn’t even there. Thanks so much.

    • Thank you, Jet! I couldn’t believe there were hundreds. So much so, I went back this morning to be there an hour earlier. There was no fog but there were over a thousand birds, forcing them to be closer to the trail. I was in awe, it was truly a blessed sighting!

    • I thought I did, Eliza! Until I went back this morning as saw over a thousand birds at the same location. That was the jackpot!! Now, I’m thinking…..should I return Sunday morning? πŸ˜‰

        • They probably arrived the evening before and spent the night there. There’s safety in numbers and they know it. It’s also the beginnings of breeding season so everyone’s looking for a mate to snuggle with!

          I went this evening and watched quite a few flocks come in at dusk. I’m going back at dawn to see what the sight is like again. πŸ™‚

  3. Wow, what a popular spot, must be a good feeding place at the moment! And how incredible almost all of them are white birds! Those white pelicans look very regal, I don’t remember hearing about those ones before, only the brown pelicans.

    • Thank you, Sue, it’s been amazing! February is prime bird month in Florida. The White Pelicans are huge and definitely regal! They come mostly from Canada and spend the winter here.

  4. What a beautiful and serene scene, and your pictures are gorgeous! I’m curious as to what lens you were using and your camera settings.

    • Thank you, Susan! I was so glad I went. I’ll come back to let you know on settings, I had both cameras with me with my 24-120mm wide angle lens and my 70-200mm telephoto lens with a 1.7x teleconverter. I think almost all of these were with my 24-120mm lens.

    • Thank you! It was glorious, so much so I returned yesterday morning to find even more birds, and so went again this morning. Another glorious morning today! I’ll never forget these sightings.

  5. Pingback: Variety of Florida Birds In Single Scenes | Photos by Donna

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