Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

.

“A visit to Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary is a journey into the heart of the Everglades ecosystem. Discover the rugged beauty of this famed natural area on Corkscrew’s famous boardwalk – a 2.5-mile adventure through pine flatwoods, wet prairie, around a marsh, and finally into the largest old growth Bald Cypress forest in North America.”Β  — Audubon Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary website

.

corkscrewboardwalkmap

Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary 2.5 mile Boardwalk

.

Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary reopened this past winter by advance ticket purchase only for limited number of people at spaced out designated entry times, allowing social distancing, and the requirement to wear a mask when near others.Β  I’ve always wanted to visit here and was able to go a few weeks ago.Β  Hardly anyone there, it was pretty awesome!

Follow me as we wander along this famous boardwalk to see some of the beauty and wildlife this preserved swamp presently bestows!

.

DSC_5766-1 22421

.

DSC_1521-1 22421

Blue Dasher

.

2 DSC_5767-1 22421

.

Lichen

.

3 DSC_1518-1 22421

.

4 DSC_5777-1 22421

.

5 DSC_5784-1 22421

.

7 DSC_5798-1 22421

.

6 DSC_5785-1 22421

.

.

Green Orchid Bee

.

Fungi

.

DSC_1651-1 22421

Raccoon

.

15 DSC_5856-1 22421

.

DSC_1678-1 22421

Limpkin

.

Strangler Fig Trees

.

DSC_1690-1 22421

Carolina Wren

.

Lots of birds in this area!

.

Blue-gray Gnatcatchers

.

DSC_1714-1 22421

Eastern Phoebe

.

DSC_1758-2 22421

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

.

18 DSC_5872-1 22421

.

DSC_1767-1 22421

Great Egret πŸ’š

.

19 DSC_5874-2 22421

.

30 DSC_1909-1 22421

Lichen – “The Rose”

.

20 DSC_5875-1 22421

One of many resting areas

.

DSC_5880-1 22421

A tree resting

.

22 DSC_5884-1 22421

Looking back…..

.

21 DSC_5882-1 22421

Let’s continue on, we’re almost done!

.

23 DSC_1801-1 22421

.

DSC_1769-1 22421

Great Egret

.

24 DSC_1803-1 22421

.

.

DSC_1820-1 22421

Great Pondhawk

.

26 DSC_1824-1 22421

.

DSC_1833-1 22421

Black Swallowtail

.

31 DSC_1912-1 22421

Exiting the boardwalk

.

We made it!Β  Thank you for tagging along with me through the beautiful Corkscrew Swamp, I hope you enjoyed it!

.

.

52 thoughts on “Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

  1. I was there 3 years ago, the place is huge and well maintained, however, I was disappointed that didn’t have much about birds or animals. I can get more variety in my backyard.
    Perhaps I wasn’t lucky and didn’t get what I read about the Corkscrew Swamp. It’s my honest opinion. πŸ™‚

    • I entered the boardwalk around 8:30 am. There was a lot of bird activity in two areas, one area there were five warblers & the Pileated Woodpecker I shared in last post. I saw two new lifers at that time (Blue-winged & Prothonotary) but was not able to get my lens on them, ugh! The others were the Palm, Black & White, and Yellow-rumped Warblers. In the area of the wren, phoebe, & gnatcatchers, it was busy there as well, there was also White Ibis deep in the back. I thought I’d see more herons and egrets but only two egrets and one Little Blue Heron (next post). The raccoon was part of a family of six scurrying around, I got lucky with just the one photo. I understand there were gators there though I did not see any. Maybe time of year or time of day was not on your side? πŸ™‚

  2. I definitely enjoyed the tour! Wonderful photos, Donna. I love boardwalk trails through swamps, something we’d never see without them. Love that crazy-red lichen and the many epiphytes.

    • Thank you, Eliza, so happy you enjoyed! I love boardwalks too, they are a definite ‘invite’ to me. The growth in some areas was so thick, the tops of ancient bald cypress trees were covered in plants. I was disappointed I failed to get a decent photo to share because of how dark it was shooting up, but it was pretty amazing to see!

  3. Wow ! What an amazing wetland Donna with so many interesting and unique features. I would be covered in DEET to go there as the mozzies could be ferocious with all that water around. You beautifully showcased the wetlands with fauna and flora, a real treat.

    • Thank you, Ashley! It was pretty awesome, I’m so glad I finally got to visit. I did spray myself with bug spray before entering. πŸ™‚ I can only imagine during our spring/summer/fall that this place is solid mosquitoes and other very nuisance biting bugs, big ones too I bet!

  4. What a wonderful walk through a place I have only been once. It brought back lots of memories and a desire to return for another Florida birding trip. Thanks for sharing!

    • Thank you, Susan, so glad to stir up those memories! I was glad I toted both cameras so I could do zoom and wide-angle, but was even more glad when I got back to my car 3+ hours later!

  5. Fabulous! My local Audubon had a boardwalk through the Wetlands, but alas, over time the beaver population has led to the water mostly drying up. I miss it, but the Audubon staff tells me that’s all part of the cycle of nature.

    • Thank you, it was a wonderful visit! Oh my, beavers do play havoc on water retention or dry-ups. Hopefully the cycle of nature is reestablishing new wildlife in that area, but water is so important to them.

    • Thank you, Ellen! Many of the remaining ancient bald cypress trees were covered at the top with bromeliads, almost creating a roof overhead. My upshots were so underexposed, none were decent enough to share. I wish I had taken more time with photographing them.

      • Oh, I know that feeling, Donna! That’s a beautiful and magical place and I’ve been sorry to read their recent reports about how the water levels are going down and the impact it is having on their flora and fauna. I do hope to get back there some day.

        • I just read the article yesterday about the low water levels and the recent Feb 2021 completion of a hydrologic modeling study to find out what exactly is impacting the continued water loss and how to stop it. The conclusion was surprising. Quoted, “While agricultural and public water supply withdrawals have some negative impacts on the Sanctuary, flood management structures and operations downstream are more directly responsible for water loss.” Of course, they cannot be removed, talks were discussed on buying surrounding properties to work & allow them to return to natural. Lots more work and studies to be done! I hope you do get back there some day, Ellen!

          • I saw that report, too. It’s very discouraging how the development in FL has destroyed so much, and that other places including SC don’t seem to learn from their experience. Ugg.

          • Audubon Florida, in their About Us website section has a bunch of Educational Webinars. One is Roseate Spoonbills in Florida: A Pink Canary in a Coal Mine — it’s pretty interesting and goes into how some of the water flow works in southern Florida.
            I’ve watched the one on Ghost Orchids at Corkscrew, too. Amazing what we don’t know!

    • Thank you! I did thoroughly enjoy it and the partly cloudy low 70s temps was wonderful. I didn’t make it up to DDNWR as I had hoped, but looking at RV resorts in 30-50 mile vicinity for possibly next winter. πŸ™‚

  6. Thanks for these fantastic pictures of the beautiful Corkscrew Swamp! I love boardwalks and this one seemed extra-long and extra-special. So many things to look at around every turn… I love the dragonflies, very different from the ones we have up here. And that reddish lichen, so unusual. The raccoon look like he was posing as a cat. πŸ™‚ So many pretty flowers and birds to appreciate! What a marvelous place.

    • Thank you, Barbara, so happy you enjoyed walking along! I love boardwalks too. The changes in the diversity was pretty awesome. I didn’t rush, stopping in areas for long moments to see what I could find. There always were surprises, I took so many photos. It was hard to narrow it down to these. πŸ™‚

  7. Beautiful shots! That walkway resembles parts of our Riverwalk.

    Love the ‘shrooms, lichen, dragonflies & the “melting” tree on the handrail. Awesome!

    • It was wonderful! Trying to keep ‘on the move’ on the boardwalk, I kept feeling like I wanted to go back as my brain kept getting other thoughts of composition. πŸ™‚ If I lived near this swamp permanently, I’d visit often for sure.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: