Eagles, Tundra Swan, Ducks & More

After photographing the Eurasian wigeon last Sunday afternoon, I was curious to see if he and the group of American wigeons would still be in the marshy inlet by the Holiday Inn here in Kent Narrows the next morning.  Alas, they weren’t, but I found a few tundra swans waking up with the lighting sky.

Tundra swans at sunrise

Five of the tundra swan decided to take flight into the morning skies….

Tundra swans in flight at sunrise

while the other tundra swans watched them, as if pondering if they should follow.

Tundra swans at sunrise

Tundra swans at sunrise

They decided to stay.  With no time to hang around, I left them to their feeding while I continued on to work.

Tuesday morning just as I was leaving, I spotted I thought to be an eagle on Lippincott’s channel marker.  My binoculars confirmed and I couldn’t leave without at least taking a few photos.  The sun was just peaking over the horizon, which lit up the eagle’s beak as he turned towards my direction in the second photo.

Immature bald eagle on Lippincott's channel marker at sunrise

Immature bald eagle on Lippincott's channel marker at sunrise

As I finished the last shots, the eagle decided to take flight and came towards and past me just beyond our osprey nest and headed over to Kent Island.  In these next photos, you’ll see he was an immature eagle, probably about 3 years old.  He’s almost developed his trademark white head and tail.

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

I said my goodbyes and got on the road to work!  As is the norm, I’m always seeing eagles and hawks along my way.  With no traffic around me, I quickly stopped and captured this red-tailed hawk perched along Rt. 50, enjoying the sunrise as well.

Red-tailed hawk at sunrise

Red-tailed Hawk at sunrise

On my way home I still had that Eurasian wigeon on my mind, and as I rounded the ramp off Rt. 50 at the Holiday Inn, I spotted numerous waterfowl and pulled in as the sun was setting.  The Eurasian wigeon was back, along with the American wigeons and tundra swan.  Lighting was getting poor…

Eurasian wigeon and tundra swan

Eurasian wigeon and tundra swan

I never got a chance to return this week to see if he stayed around longer.  Wednesday we had severe weather and heavy downpours mid-afternoon, as I arrived home they had passed, with a light rain still lingering.  As I always do (Rick will confirm this!), I drop my belongings and go out onto our balcony to see what’s going on and breath in some of that great Chesapeake Bay air!  As I was grabbing my camera, I almost tripped over my own feet when I glanced outside.  An immature eagle was on our osprey nest in the light rain.

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

I took quite a few photos, some from inside my glass sliders so I wouldn’t scare him off.  Shortly thereafter, he started to get antsy and took flight.

Immature bald eagle

Immature bald eagle

As I photographed him flying off, it was then I heard another eagle call out and turn to see an adult eagle come speeding in fast gear past me from CBEC/Marshy Creek area and go after the immature eagle.  My first thought was it was possibly a parent who was going to interact/teach his young as they have been doing over at CBEC, but I quickly learned that this adult eagle was in combat mode as it repeatedly tried to attack the immature one.

Adult bald eagle speeding past to chase an immature bald eagle out of his territory

Adult bald eagle chasing an immature bald eagle out of his territory

Adult bald eagle chasing an immature bald eagle out of his territory

Adult eagle attacking an immature bald eagle

After that last photo, the adult bald eagle actually attacked the immature bald eagle and then continued to chase him as he tried to maneuver to get away.  Satisfied with the distance the adult eagle chased the immature eagle, he turned around and came back past me and flew over to CBEC.  I’m guessing it was a territorial skirmish.  I will admit it was a pure treat to find that eagle on our osprey nest!

Thursday morning as I was leaving, I found a squirrel on the sidewalk.  Now every time I go to grab my camera to photograph a squirrel, I’ll turn and he will be gone!  So this time I just stood still and watched him until he went up a pine tree and settled on a branch.  Then I grabbed my camera from my bag and got a few shots while he munched on an acorn.  Not the greatest shots but THIS time I was successful in at least getting him!

This robin was singing in a tree across from the squirrel.

American Robin

As I drove out of our community’s entrance and passed Lippincott’s side-by-side entrance, I caught sight of a Great blue heron wading in their small marshy area.

Great Blue Heron at sunrise

Great Blue Heron at sunrise

Oh boy, now I’m really running late into work!  Told myself no more stopping, but while enroute I thought I sighted an eagle perched ahead of me.  As I was stopping (got to for an eagle not flying!), I realized it was a turkey vulture. They are one bird that doesn’t easily scare so I gave him a small photo ops session.  🙂  Not the prettiest of birds but he is one!

Turkey Vulture

Friday ended well when I got home, our ‘backyard’ was full with several rafts of scaup and canvasback feeding.  They are fun to watch as they dive and then bunch back together for safety.

Canvasbacks and Scaups rafting together

Scaups

Scaups

Canvasbacks

Canvasbacks

All in all, a great week for bird captures for me.  I hope you enjoyed, and as always, thanks for stopping by!

14 thoughts on “Eagles, Tundra Swan, Ducks & More

    • Thanks Cornel, he is one evasive squirrel, now I know how to get him to be still! 🙂 Those tundra swans are magnificent is size and beauty, I love watching their gracefulness, and it’s always a treat to photograph them.

  1. Nice color in those early morning shots. That is a nice reward for not going back to sleep. I especially like the color on the swans.

    As another complement, it is nice to see a post of a Turkey Vulture, and the color again is special. It is a trap to only photograph the “popular” birds. We need to appreciate our sanitation workers, whether human or avian.

    Nice work Donna.

    Paul S.

    • Thanks Paul for your comments! I love it in the early morning, most birds are very active then. Getting up and out that early is the hard part, but is almost always worth it! 🙂 There’s nothing like hearing our wildlife wake up our world.

  2. Wow, what great photos and the lighting in the first few was so beautiful. Amazing photos of the young eagle too. Can’t wait to see our ducks coming back, but hoping for more open water around here.

    • Thanks Joleen, because I was eager to possibly getting some shots just at the sun was rising, it wasn’t so bad getting up just a little bit earlier. Glad I did, sunrise and sunset lighting really can be the best time. 🙂 I’ve enjoyed our winter birds/ducks, but I too can’t wait for our summer birds & ducks to return from their migrations!

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