Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

My last post featured a Gray Catbird flanked with pink orchids, and I mentioned another tiny bird I was watching in that same tree for this next post.

Had I known, I’d have visited much sooner this Hong Kong orchid tree in Everglades City that I found to be a magnet for Ruby-throated Hummingbirds.  I saw six at one time drinking the nectar from the orchids several days ago.

 

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female)

 

Photographing them high up in a tree with their quick movements wasn’t so easy.  With no luck prior, I spent extra time the last two evenings to take on the challenge of getting at least a couple nice photos before the orchids and they disappeared.  All while sitting on my birding mobile!  😉

Bingo!

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (females)

 

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female)

 

I hope these brightened your day as they did mine!

 

 

52 thoughts on “Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

  1. Beautiful Donna! I am getting ready to put out our hummingbird feeder in the next few days. I am curious as to what shutter speed you used. I play around with 1/2000 to 1/3200 last summer and that seemed to work although unless there was bright sunlight the ISO was pretty high.

    • Thank you, Mike! YES!!!!! Vacations before retirement were always so darn short, and it was always hard to experience an area in true depth. If it’s possible, we plan to return here next January and repeat. 😊

      • Yes, retirement has a lot of advantages. We have (or at least had until the virus started) plans to do more travelling, especially by car from our vantage point here in the middle of Europe. In a little over 8 hours we can be in Spain or Croatia. Italy and France of course are near neighbours and, as large countries (relatively of course) they will take a lot of exploring.

  2. They are so adorable. I’ve had Hummingbirds visit me on my front porch, checking me out. They are loud when you are close to them. They sound like tiny helicopters. Scare the s*** out of you if they surprise you. 😳

  3. Beautiful! Looks a lot like our Anna’s tho I bet the throat is more a ruby shade (as in the name). The Anna’s are more a magenta. Aren’t they just wonderful?

      • We’re seeing mostly male Anna’s and Allen’s doing their courtship flights and/or squabbling over feeder access. Wondering if perhaps mating is over and the females are busy feeding the babies while the males have moved on. I think that’s what happens here, but a bit later.

        • You are probably right! I keep forgetting that breeding is earlier down in Florida. At home, the Osprey are just arriving. Here in Florida, the chicks already look almost fully grown! Duh Donna! 😉

  4. You must know by now that I love the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, every year the visit my backyard to delight me! Your photos are simply gorgeous! Thank you, Donna. Indeed brightened my day! 🙂

  5. I love hummers! I’m looking forward to their return in about 6 weeks. I plant many things just for them – a favorite is the annual Cuphea ‘Vermillionaire.’ They can’t get enough of it.

    • Thank you, Ashley! It has been a wonderful winter in Florida. I would never have imagined to see so many birds, many habitating together, making it even more awesome. Alas, all things to come an end, it’s time to leave in a few days and head back north…..where I should find some of these birds & others migrating that way too!

  6. I find these birds so exciting because they come and go so quickly that you can wait a day and still miss them. Maybe I am just speaking for myself here. I am happy for you that you captured these shots and for me because I get to see them. What pretty blossoms! Thank-you!

  7. Beautiful photos of an exquisite little bird that I’ve never heard of, let alone observed. I do love your bird images and this is an amazing capture. Very well done, Donna.

  8. It will be another month or so before we see our black throats and broad tail hummers. Then another month still for the rufous. Such beautiful photos. I especially like the third with the curved branch and good pose.

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